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Voltage Clamp Techniques Applied to Cultured Skeletal Muscle and Spinal Neurons

  • Thomas G. SmithJr.
  • Jeffery L. Barker
  • Bruce M. Smith
  • Theodore R. Colburn

Abstract

For many years there has been an apocryphal story circulating around the National Institutes of Health about Dr. K. S. Cole, the developer of the voltage clamp technique (Cole, 1949, 1972). It seems that Cole was being introduced to a distinguished group of scientists in some landlocked European country. The introducer remarked that he had always felt that the voltage clamp was the “devil’s own invention” and it was his “pleasure to introduce the devil.” Well, if the voltage clamp is the devil’s own invention, then microelectrodes are the devil’s own tools when it comes to using them in voltage clamping, since they are the main source of the problems and limitations in applying the technique successfully.

Keywords

Voltage Clamp Spinal Cord Neuron Dorsal Root Ganglion Cell Current Feedback Voltage Clamp Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas G. SmithJr.
    • 1
  • Jeffery L. Barker
    • 1
  • Bruce M. Smith
    • 2
  • Theodore R. Colburn
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Neurophysiology, National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Research Services Branch, National Institute of Mental HealthNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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