Advertisement

New Theories in Psychoanalysis

  • Anna Freud
  • Otto Rank
  • Paul Federn
  • Sandor Ferenczi
  • Melanie Klein
  • W. Ronald Fairbairn
  • Heinz Hartmann
  • René Spitz
  • Margaret Mahler
  • Edith Jacobson
  • Otto Kernberg
  • Heinz Kohut
  • Wilhelm Reich
  • Kardiner
  • Linton
  • Erik H. Erikson
  • Robert Jay Lifton

Abstract

Adler’s and Jung’s disagreements with Freud were on matters of theory and principle. Both Adler and Jung rejected the concepts of Eros and Thanatos, the theory of developmental stages, and the personality model based on the id, ego, and superego.

Keywords

Psychoanalytic Theory Personality Structure Toilet Training Object Relation Theory Oedipus Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alexander, F. Fundamentals of psychoanalysis. New York: Norton, 1949.Google Scholar
  2. Alexander, F. Psychosomatic medicine: Its principles and applications. New York: Norton, 1950.Google Scholar
  3. Alexander, F. Our age of unreason. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1951.Google Scholar
  4. Alexander, F., & Ross, H. (Eds.) Twenty years of psychoanalysis. New York: Norton, 1953.Google Scholar
  5. Bergler, E. Superego, unconscious, conscience. New York: Grune & Stratton, 1952.Google Scholar
  6. Bergmann, G. Psychoanalysis and experimented psychology: A review from the standpoint of scientific empiricism. Mind, 1943, 52, 122–140.Google Scholar
  7. Blanck, G., & Blanck, R. Ego psychology: Theory and practice. New York: Columbia University Press, 1974.Google Scholar
  8. Brierley, M. Trends in psychoanalysis. London: Hogarth, 1951.Google Scholar
  9. Coles, R. Erikson, Erik Homburger (b. 1902 ) In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), International encyclopedia of psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis and neurology. New York: Aesculapius, 1977, Vol. 4, pp. 370 ff.Google Scholar
  10. Dahl, H. A quantitative study of a psychoanalysis. In R. R. Holt & E. Peterfreund (Eds.) Psychoanalysis and contemporary science: An annual of integrative and interdisciplinary studies. New York: Macmillan, 1972, pp. 237–257.Google Scholar
  11. Daim, W. Umwertung der Psychoanalyse. Wien: Herold, 1951.Google Scholar
  12. Deutsch, F. On the mysterious leap from the mind to the body. New York: International Universities Press, 1959.Google Scholar
  13. Erikson, E. K. Childhood and society. New York: Norton, 1950.Google Scholar
  14. Fairbairn, W. R. D. Psychoanalytic studies of personality. London: Routledge, 1952.Google Scholar
  15. Fairbairn, W. R. D. An object-relations theory of personality. New York: Basic Books, 1954.Google Scholar
  16. Federn, P. Ego psychology and the psychoses. New York: Basic Books, 1953.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Fenichel, O. Collected papers. New York: Norton, 1953–1954, 2 vols.Google Scholar
  18. Ferenczi, S. Contributions to psychoanalysis. Boston: Badger, 1916.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Ferenczi, S. Further contributions to the theory and technique of psychoanalysis. London: Hogarth, 1926.Google Scholar
  20. Ferenczi, S. Sex in psychoanalysis. New York: Basic Books, 1950.Google Scholar
  21. Ferenczi, S. First contributions to psychoanalysis. London: Hogarth, 1953.Google Scholar
  22. Freud, A. The ego and the mechanisms of defense. International Universities Press, 1946.Google Scholar
  23. French, T. M. The integration of behavior. Vol. I. Basic postulates. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1952.Google Scholar
  24. Gill, M. Topography and systems in psychoanalytic theory. Psychological Issues, 1963, 10.Google Scholar
  25. Glover, E. Examination of the Klein system of child psychology. Psychoanal. Study of the Child, 1945, 1.Google Scholar
  26. Goodman, S. (Ed.) Psychoanalytic education and research. New York: International Universities Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  27. Hanly, C., & Lazerowitz, M. Psychoanalysis and philosophy. New York: International Universities Press, 1970.Google Scholar
  28. Hartmann, H. Comments on the psychoanalytic theory of the ego. Psychoanal. Study of the Child, 1950, 5.Google Scholar
  29. Hartmann, H. Ego psychology and the problem of adaptation. New York: International Universities Press, 1959.Google Scholar
  30. Hartmann, H., Kris, E., & Loewenstein, R. M. Comments on the formation of psychic structure. Psychoanal. Study of the Child, 1947, 2.Google Scholar
  31. Holt, R. R. Motives and thought. Psychological Issues, 1967, 18–19.Google Scholar
  32. Holt, R. R. Beyond vitalism and mechanism: Freud’s concept of psychic energy. In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), Historical roots of contemporary psychology. New York: Harper & Row, 1968, pp. 196–226.Google Scholar
  33. Holt, R. R. Freud’s mechanistic and humanistic images of man. In R. R. Holt & E. Peterfreund (Eds.), Psychoanalysis and contemporary science: An annual of integrative and interdisciplinary studies. New York: Macmillan, 1972, pp. 3–24.Google Scholar
  34. Jacobson, E. The self and the object world. International Universities Press, 1964.Google Scholar
  35. Kahn, M. Winnicott, Donald W. (1896–1971). In B. B. Wolman, International encyclopedia of psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis, and neurology. New York: Aesculapius, 1977, Vol. 11, pp. 424–425.Google Scholar
  36. Kanzer, M., and Blum, H. Classical Psychoanalysis since 1939. In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), Psychoanalytic techniques. New York: Basic Books, 1967, pp. 93–147.Google Scholar
  37. Kaplan, H. I., Sardock, B. J., & Freedman, A. M. Erik Erikson, In A. M. Freedman, H. I. Kaplan, & B. J. Sardick (Eds.), Comprehensive textbook of psychiatry. (2nd ed.) Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1975, pp. 566–573.Google Scholar
  38. Kardiner, A. The individual and his society. New York: Columbia University Press, 1939.Google Scholar
  39. Kardiner, A. The psychological frontiers of society. New York: Columbia University Press, 1945.Google Scholar
  40. Karpf, M. Psychology and psychotherapy of Otto Rank. New York: Philosophical Library, 1953.Google Scholar
  41. Klein, G. S. (Ed.) Psychological issues. New York: International Universities Press, 1959, Vol. 1.Google Scholar
  42. Klein, G. S. Psychoanalytic theory: An examination of essentials. New York: International Universities Press, 1973.Google Scholar
  43. Klein, M. The psychoanalysis of children. London: Hogarth, 1932.Google Scholar
  44. Klein, M. Contributions of psychoanalysis, 1921–1948. London: Hogarth, 1948.Google Scholar
  45. Klein, M., Heimann, P., Isaacs, S., & Riviere, J. Developments in psychoanalysis. London: Hogarth, 1952.Google Scholar
  46. Klein, M., & Riviere, J. Love, hate and separation. London: Hogarth, 1938.Google Scholar
  47. Kohut, H. The analysis of the self. New York: International Universities Press, 1971.Google Scholar
  48. Kris, E. The nature of psychoanalytic propositions and their validation. In S. Hook & R. Konvitz (Eds.), Freedom and experience. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1947.Google Scholar
  49. Kris, E. Psychoanalytic explorations in art. New York: International Universities Press, 1952.Google Scholar
  50. Kubie, L. S. Psychoanalysis and scientific method. J. nerv. ment. Dis., 1960, 131, 495–512.Google Scholar
  51. Lifton, R. J. The protean man. In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), The psychoanalytic interpretation of history. New York: Harper Torchbook, 1973.Google Scholar
  52. Lowenstein, R. M. (Ed.) Drives, affects, behavior: Contributions to the theory and practice of psychoanalysis and its applications. New York: International Universities Press, 1953.Google Scholar
  53. Mahler, M. On human symbiosis and the vicissitudes of individuation. New York: International Universities Press, 1968.Google Scholar
  54. Marcus, I. M. (Ed.) Currents in psychoanalysis. New York: International Universities Press, 1971.Google Scholar
  55. Marmor, J. Psychiatry in transition. New York: Bruner/Mazel, 1974.Google Scholar
  56. Mayman, M. Psychoanalytic research. Psychological Issues, 1973, 30.Google Scholar
  57. Meissner, W. W., Mack, J. E., & Semrad, E. V. Classical psychoanalysis. In A. M. Freedman, H. I. Kaplan, & B. J. Sadock (Eds.), Comprehensive textbook of psychiatry. (2nd ed.) Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1975, pp. 482–566.Google Scholar
  58. Miller, N. E., & Dollard, J. Social learning and imitation. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1941.Google Scholar
  59. Mowrer, O. H. Learning theory and personality dynamics. New York: Ronald, 1950.Google Scholar
  60. Mullahy, P. Oedipus myth and complex. New York: Hermitage, 1948.Google Scholar
  61. Nuttin, J. Psychoanalysis and personality. New York: Sheed & Ward, 1953.Google Scholar
  62. Oberndorf, C. P. History of psychoanalysis in America. New York: Grune & Stratton, 1953.Google Scholar
  63. Peterfreund, E. Information, systems, and psychoanalysis. Psychological Issues, 1971, 25–26.Google Scholar
  64. Pettit, T. F. Anality and time. J. Consult. Clin. Psychol 1969, 33, 170–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Pumpian-Mindlin, E. (Ed.) Psychoanalysis as science. New York: Basic Books, 1952.Google Scholar
  66. Rank, O. Art and artist. New York: Knopf, 1932.Google Scholar
  67. Rank, O. Modern education. New York: Knopf, 1932.Google Scholar
  68. Rank, O. Beyond psychology. New York: Haddon, 1941.Google Scholar
  69. Rank, O. Will therapy and truth and reality. New York: Knopf, 1945.Google Scholar
  70. Rank, O. Psychology and the soul. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1950.Google Scholar
  71. Rank, O. The myth of the birth of the hero. New York: Brunner, 1952.Google Scholar
  72. Rank, O. Trauma of birth. New York: Brunner, 1952.Google Scholar
  73. Rank, O., & Ferenczi, S. The development of psychoanalysis. New York: Nervous & Mental Disease Publishing Co., 1925.Google Scholar
  74. Rapaport, D. On the psychoanalytic theory of thinking. Int. J. Psychoanal., 1950, 31, 1–10.Google Scholar
  75. Rapaport, D. On the psychoanalytic theory of affects. Int. J. Psychoanal., 1953, 34, 177–198.Google Scholar
  76. Rapaport, D., & Gill, M. The points of view and assumptions of metapsychology. Int. J. Psychoanal. 1959, 40, 153–162.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  77. Reich, W. Character analysis. New York: Orgone Institute, 1945.Google Scholar
  78. Bteik, T. Listening with the third ear. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1949.Google Scholar
  79. Roheim, G. Psychoanalysis and anthropology; culture, personality, and the unconscious. New York: International Universities Press, 1950.Google Scholar
  80. Roheim, G. The gates of the dream. New York: International Universities Press, 1952.Google Scholar
  81. Sachs, H. The creative unconscious: Studies in the psychoanalysis of art. (2nd ed.) Boston: Sci-Art, 1951.Google Scholar
  82. Sarnoff, I. Testing Freudian concepts. New York: Springer, 1971.Google Scholar
  83. Sarnoff, I., & Zimbardo, P. G. Anxiety, fear and social affiliation. J. abnorm, soc. Psychol, 1961, 62, 356–363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Sartre, J. P. Existential psychoanalysis. New York: Philosophical Library, 1953.Google Scholar
  85. Schafer, R. An overview of Heinz Hartmann’s contributions to psychoanalysis. Int. J. Psychoanal, 1970, 51, 425–446.Google Scholar
  86. Spitz, R. A. The first year of life. New York: International Universities Press, 1965.Google Scholar
  87. Sutherland, J. D. Fairbairn, W. Ronald D. (1890–1964). In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), International encyclopedia of psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis and neurology. New York: Aesculapius, 1977, Vol. 4, pp. 449–450.Google Scholar
  88. Tennes, K., Emde, R., Kisley, A., & Metealf, D. The stimulus barrier in early infancy: An exploration of John Benjamin. In R. R. Holt & E. Peterfreund (Eds.), Psychoanalysis and contemporary science. New York: Macmillan, 1972, Vol. 1, pp. 206–236.Google Scholar
  89. Watkins, J. G. Psychotherapeutic methods. In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), Handbook of clinical psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1965, pp. 1143–1168.Google Scholar
  90. Weber, J. Psychoanalytic research: Studies of outcome. In B. B. Wolman, International encyclopedia of psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis and neurology. New York: Aesculapius, 1977, Vol. 9, pp. 211–212.Google Scholar
  91. Wolman, B. B. Schizophrenia and related disorders. In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), Handbook of clinical psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1965, pp. 976–1030.Google Scholar
  92. Wolman, B. B. (Ed.) The psychoanalytic interpretation of history. New York: Basic Books, 1971.Google Scholar
  93. Wolman, B. B. (Ed.) Dictionary of behavioral science. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1973.Google Scholar
  94. Wolman, B. B. Call no man normal New York: International Universities Press, 1973.Google Scholar
  95. Wolman, B. B. Power and acceptance as determinants of social relations. Int. J. Group Tensions, 1974, 4, 151–182.Google Scholar
  96. Wolman, B. B. Principles of interactional psychotherapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, and Practice, 1975, 12, 149–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Wolman, B. B. New ideas on mental disorders. Am. J. Psychotherapy, 1977, 31, 546–560.Google Scholar
  98. Wolman, B. B. Interactional psychoanalytic theory. In B. B. Wolman ( Ed.)/ International encyclopedia of psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis and neurology. New York: Ed.)/ International encyclopedia of psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis and neurology. 1977, Vol. 6, pp. 122–125.Google Scholar
  99. Wolman, B. B. Psychoanalysis as science. In B. B. Wolman (Ed.), International encyclopedia of psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis and neurology. New York: Aesculapius, 1977, Vol. 9, pp. 149–157.Google Scholar
  100. Zimbardo, P. G., & Formica, R. Emotional comparison and self esteem as determinants of affiliation. J. Vers., 1963, 31, 141–162.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Freud
  • Otto Rank
  • Paul Federn
  • Sandor Ferenczi
  • Melanie Klein
  • W. Ronald Fairbairn
  • Heinz Hartmann
  • René Spitz
  • Margaret Mahler
  • Edith Jacobson
  • Otto Kernberg
  • Heinz Kohut
  • Wilhelm Reich
  • Kardiner
  • Linton
  • Erik H. Erikson
  • Robert Jay Lifton

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations