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Neo-Behaviorism and Learning Theory

  • Edwin R. Guthrie
  • Clark L. Hull
  • B. F. Skinner
  • Edward C. Tolman
  • Gregory Razran
  • John Dollard
  • Neal E. Miller
  • O. Hobart Mowrer
  • Robert R. Sears

Abstract

The most persistent advocate of conditioning is undoubtedly E. R. Guthrie. Guthrie considers association by contiguity in time, or “simultaneous conditioning,” the most general law in psychology. “Stimuli acting at the time of a response tend on their recurrence to evoke that response,” he says. Any other type of behavior can be derived from simultaneous conditioning. Especially the processes of learning represent the general law of stimulaneous conditioning or association by contiguity in time of stimuli and responses. “The outstanding characteristics of learning which have been expressed in forms of frequency, intensity, irradiation, temporary extinction, conditioned inhibition, forgetting, forward and backward conditioning, and so on, are all derivable from this more general law,” 1 Guthrie believes.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Unconditioned Stimulus Learning Theory Conditioned Response Classical Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Guthrie, Hull, Skinner, Tolman, Razran

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Learning Theory Influenced by Psychoanalysis

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin R. Guthrie
  • Clark L. Hull
  • B. F. Skinner
  • Edward C. Tolman
  • Gregory Razran
  • John Dollard
  • Neal E. Miller
  • O. Hobart Mowrer
  • Robert R. Sears

There are no affiliations available

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