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Detecting the Dimensions of Depression

Behavioral Assessment in Therapy Outcome Research
  • Lynn P. Rehm
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 6)

Abstract

My intent in this chapter is to describe a series of psychotherapy outcome studies which we have conducted at the University of Pittsburgh. In doing so, however, I want to emphasize and make specific reference to the issues of assessing depression in its various aspects for the purposes of psychotherapy outcome research. In order to discuss the problems that arise in assessing depression, I will start out with a brief review of some current conceptions of the nature of depression which are relevant to assessment strategy. I will briefly discuss the symptomatology of depression and the broad spectrum of behaviors which it includes, I also want to comment on the current state of the art of methods currently used to assess depression. Given the variety of symptoms displayed by depressed persons, an assessment strategy needs to incorporate a variety of assessment modalities to adequately assess the disorder. The word “detecting” was used in the title of this paper not only for the purposes of alliteration, but to reflect the fact that, whereas there is some agreement as to the clinical phenomena of depression, the methods which have been devised to assess these phenomena have not been entirely successful.

Keywords

Depressed Individual Depressed Subject Abnormal Psychology Depressed Person Pleasant Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynn P. Rehm
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HoustonHoustonUSA

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