Behavioral and Metabolic Factors in Childhood Obesity

  • Joël A. Grinker
Part of the Genesis of Behavior book series (GOBE, volume 3)

Abstract

Obesity is one of the most prevalent nutritional disorders in America today. Epidemiological studies report that from 25 to 45% of adult American men and women suffer from overweight or obesity (Ten State Nutrition Survey, 1972).1 In spite of the number and variety of approaches to weight reduction, including special diets, exercise, behavior modification, and pharmacological intervention, obesity remains intractable (Bray, 1978; Stunkard & McLaren-Hume, 1959). The major failures of treatment lie not in the ineffectiveness of various procedures to produce weight reduction but in the inability to sustain the weight loss. For example, hospitalization accompanied by severe or total caloric restriction leads to dramatic but short-lasting weight loss. Within three years following hospitalization, over 90% of the patients have regained the lost weight (Drenick, 1973).

Keywords

Sugar Obesity Sucrose Corn Carbohydrate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joël A. Grinker
    • 1
  1. 1.Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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