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Down’s Syndrome Children

Characteristics and Intervention Research
  • Marci J. Hanson
Part of the Genesis of Behavior book series (GOBE, volume 3)

Abstract

Down’s syndrome is generally believed to be the most common specific form of mental retardation. For a number of years, this syndrome has evoked great interest from researchers in a variety of fields—education, psychological, medical. Given that the physical stigmata typically associated with this syndrome are recognizable from birth, that medical complications often are present, and the finding that individuals with Down’s syndrome have benefited greatly from educational intervention, it is not surprising that this syndrome has been the target of many research efforts.

Keywords

Motor Development Normal Infant Infant Behavior Mental Deficiency Developmental Quotient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marci J. Hanson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Special EducationSan Francisco State UniversitySan FranciscoUSA

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