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On the Tarsiiform Origins of Anthropoidea

  • A. L. Rosenberger
  • F. S. Szalay
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (AIPR)

Abstract

Many systematic papers of the past decade have employed a cladistic approach. Reasons for this lie largely in the superficially rigorous appearance of this method and, therefore, the impression of a powerful tool. An unvarying commitment to the operational underpinnings of cladism has led to the acceptance of a systematic methodology which perforce only recognizes, and can only search for, sister-group relationships (e.g., Engelman and Wiley, 1977). The notion of ancestor-descendant relationships, or to put it differently, that phena transform from antecedent phena, has been simply set aside. This fundamental aspect of real evolutionary history has come to be ignored at the expense of a method because hypotheses of descent are claimed to be unfalsifiable, whereas sister-group relationships are thought to be easily refutable.

Keywords

World Monkey Cheek Tooth External Auditory Meatus Tympanic Cavity Transverse Septum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. L. Rosenberger
    • 1
  • F. S. Szalay
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Illinois at Chicago CircleChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyHunter CollegeNew YorkUSA

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