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Paleobiogeographic Perspectives on the Origin of the Platyrrhini

  • R. L. Ciochon
  • A. B. Chiarelli
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (AIPR)

Abstract

This chapter will explore the various hypotheses and scenarios that have been advanced concerning the paleobiogeographic source of origin of the Platyrrhini. The specific questions to be addressed include: (1) From what geographical region or regions were the immediate ancestors of the New World monkeys derived? (2) When and by what means did these first platyrrhines reach the island continent of South America? (3) What influence did continental drift have on the geographic source of origin and mode of dispersal of the Platyrrhini? Nearly all of the preceding chapters in this volume have attempted to specifically answer one or more of these questions. It is our purpose herein to provide a background for the discussion of all these paleobiogeographic proposals and then to present a consensus-oriented maximum-parsimony model of platyrrhine origins and dispersal.

Keywords

World Monkey Late Eocene Historical Biogeography Continental Drift Late CRETACEOUS 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Ciochon
    • 1
  • A. B. Chiarelli
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and SociologyUniversity of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA
  2. 2.Istituto di AntropologiaUniversità di FirenzeFirenzeItaly

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