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Transesophageal Ultrasonic Imaging of the Heart

  • Balasubramanian Rajagopalan
  • Eugene P. DiMagno
  • James F. Greenleaf
  • Patrick T. Regan
  • James Buxton
  • Philip S. Green
  • J. William Whitaker
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 9)

Abstract

In echocardiology ultrasound backscattering is used to visualize heart structures. The various realtime cardiac scanners give detailed dynamic pictures of the moving boundaries of cardiac anatomy [1, 2, 3, 4]. The intensity of ultrasonic backscattering from within the myocardial tissue may vary with the normal and ischemic status of the heart tissue [5, 6]. Balasubram-anian Rajagopalan, et al., [7] first reported that regional myocardial perfusion could be imaged using ultrasonic backscattering when suitable contrast agents were arterially introduced. Using a 10 MHz high resolution B-scanner that was placed directly on the surface of the heart of anesthetized dog after a left thoracotomy, the authors showed that the backscattering from the myocardial mass was enhanced significantly if an ultrasound contrast agent such as indocyanine green was injected into the left ventricle or at the aortic root. This enhancement of backscattering was observed to be related to regional blood flow since after deprivation of blood supply to a region of the myocardium, the intensity of backscattering from the deprived region did not exhibit enhancement with the injection of the contrast agent.

Keywords

Mitral Valve Aortic Root Indocyanine Green Ultrasonic Transducer Ultrasound Contrast Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Balasubramanian Rajagopalan
    • 1
  • Eugene P. DiMagno
    • 2
  • James F. Greenleaf
    • 1
  • Patrick T. Regan
    • 2
  • James Buxton
    • 3
  • Philip S. Green
    • 3
  • J. William Whitaker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Gastroenterology UnitMayo ClinicRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Bioengineering Research CenterSRI InternationalMenlo ParkUSA

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