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Theory and Measurements of Ultrasonic Scattering for Tissue Characterization

  • Robert C. Waag
Part of the Acoustical Imaging book series (ACIM, volume 9)

Abstract

It is known among scientists and clinicians working in medical ultrasound that more information than time of arrival and amplitude is contained in the ultrasonic echoes produced by tissue. This has led to a variety of investigations (1–5) with the common objective of extracting additional information to characterize tissue more completely from its ultrasonic properties. Among the various studies are those concerned with sound speed, absorption, and a general class of research that falls under the category of acoustic scattering. The scattering investigations are the subject of this review.

Keywords

Sound Speed Scattered Wave Tissue Characterization Acoustic Scattering Average Particle Radius 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert C. Waag
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Electrical Engineering and RadiologyUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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