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Characteristics of Some Monoamine Uptake Systems in Isolated Cerebral Capillaries

  • T. Abe
  • K. Abe
  • W. D. Rausch
  • I. Klatzo
  • M. Spatz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 131)

Abstract

It has been well documented that the biogenic amines do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) easily (1), however, little information is available concerning the mechanism of this barrier (2). As early as 1965, Hamberger and Masuoka (3) had suggested that the pericytes of the cerebral capillaries may play a role in the removal and inactivation of noradrenaline (NA or NE). They demonstrated NE uptake in pericytes and in the wall of capillaries by a histofluorescence technique when brain slices were pretreated with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor. The same function was attributed to the glia, cells that are rich in MAO and catechol-0-methyl transferase (COMT), enzymes present in the cerebral capillaries as well (4–6). Glia enriched cell fractions and mouse glioma have also been found to take up neurotransmitters (2,5). However, characterization of biogenic amine uptake in either the cerebral capillaries and/or glia has not yet been elucidated.

Keywords

Biogenic Amine Isobutyric Acid Cerebral Microvessels Cold Substrate Cerebral Capillary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Abe
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Abe
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. D. Rausch
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Klatzo
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Spatz
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Neuropathology and Neuroanatomical Sciences, National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of Health, Public Health ServiceBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Department of Health, Education and WelfareBethesdaUSA

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