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Behaviour of the Blood-Brain Barrier Toward Biogenic Amines in Experimental Cerebral Ischemia

  • H. Hervonen
  • O. Steinwall
  • M. Spatz
  • I. Klatzo
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 131)

Abstract

Considering the blood-brain barrier (BBB) as a conglomerate of regulatory systems concerned with maintenance of a homeostatically controlled biochemical environment for the brain parenchyma, it can be assumed that any dysfunction of these systems caused by cerebral ischemia may significantly influence the pathology of resulting lesions. Previous studies of the effect of ischemia on the BBB demonstrated that various substances differ with regard to the time and intensity of their abnormal passage from blood into brain. Thus, it was demonstrated that after cerebral ischemia, the breakdown of the BBB to micromolecular substances such as 14C-sucrose or sodium fluorescein precedes and lasts much longer than the breakdown of the BBB to proteins (1), which occurs with a delay dependent upon the severity of ischemic insult, according to the principle of the “maturation” phenomenon (2,3).

Keywords

Cerebral Ischemia Biogenic Amine Evans Blue Mongolian Gerbil Sodium Fluorescein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Hervonen
    • 1
    • 2
  • O. Steinwall
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Spatz
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Klatzo
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Neuropathology and Neuroanatomical Sciences, National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and StrokeNational Institutes of Health, Public Health ServiceBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Department of Health, Education and WelfareBethesdaUSA

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