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Abnormalities of the Cerebral Microcirculation after Traumatic Injury: The Relationship of Hypertension and Prostaglandins

  • H. A. Kontos
  • W. D. Dietrich
  • E. P. Wei
  • E. F. Ellis
  • J. T. Povlishock
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 131)

Abstract

Abnormalities of the cerebral circulation are frequently seen in patients with head injury, as well as in animals subjected to experimental brain injury (1). Despite considerable interest in the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities, no comprehensive hypothesis has been advanced to explain their pathogenesis. The practical value of a fuller understanding of the mechanisms responsible for abnormal circulatory function in brain injury is high because it may lead to more rational, therapeutic intervention.

Keywords

Brain Injury Free Oxygen Radical Chronic Granulomatous Disease Small Arteriole Cranial Window 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. A. Kontos
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • W. D. Dietrich
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • E. P. Wei
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • E. F. Ellis
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. T. Povlishock
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineMedical College of Virginia, Health Sciences Division of Virginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyMedical College of Virginia, Health Sciences Division of Virginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  3. 3.Department of PharmacologyMedical College of Virginia, Health Sciences Division of Virginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA

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