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Bacterial Exo-Enzyme and Exo-Toxin Export

  • E. A. Pepper
  • J. Melling
  • R. C. W. Berkeley

Abstract

It has been proposed that Bacillus licheniformis penicillinase production depends on a phospholipoprotein intermediate and an exo-enzyme releasing protease. Studies using cerulenin, a lipid synthesis inhibitor, and quinacrine, a protease inhibitor, which are presumed to interfere with phospholipoprotein synthesis and the releasing protease respectively, with this penicillinase and other exo-proteins suggest a common export mechanism for proteins. However, recent findings on the nature of the exo-penicillinase precursor cast doubt on this mechanism and its ubiquity.

Keywords

Leader Sequence Membrane Lipid Composition Untreated Culture Nascent Polypeptide glycosYl Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Pepper
    • 1
  • J. Melling
    • 2
  • R. C. W. Berkeley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Bacteriology, The Medical SchoolUniversity WalkBristolUK
  2. 2.Centre for Applied Microbiology and ResearchSalisbury, WiltshireUK

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