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Rheology pp 647-658 | Cite as

The Rheology of Polymers with Liquid Crystalline Order

  • Donald G. Baird

Abstract

Liquid crystals are substances that possess mechanical properties resembling those of fluids yet are structured enough to diffract X-rays and transmit polarized light. The liquid crystalline state is believed to be an intermediate phase between the isotropic fluid state and the crystalline solid state. For this reason these fluids are also referred to as mesophases. Because of the unique optical properties they are also termed anisotropic fluids. Low molecular weight compounds which form liquid crystals have been studied for over a century. However, it has been only in the last thirty years that liquid crystalline order has been found to exist in polymeric systems.

Keywords

Shear Rate Liquid Crystalline Polymer Anisotropic Fluid Liquid Crystalline State Anisotropic Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald G. Baird
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Chemical Engineering and Engineering Science and MechanicsVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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