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Central vs. Peripheral Aging

  • Richard G. Cutler
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 129)

Abstract

The slow but progressive deterioration of man’s health, followed by an increased onset frequency of diseases, results mostly from a complex spectrum of time-dependent changes collectively called aging (1). There is agreement that substantial prolongation of useful and enjoyable life span would require a uniform decrease in the rate of expression of most of these aging processes (2,3). However, there is much disagreement on the probability and advisability of slowing down man’s aging rate, a process often considered to be incredibly complex (4,5).

Keywords

Aging Rate Primate Species Maximum Life Span Hominid Evolution Maximum Life Span Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard G. Cutler
    • 1
  1. 1.Gerontology Research Center National Institute on Aging National Institutes of HealthBaltimore City HospitalsBaltimoreUSA

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