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Changes in Synaptic Structure Affecting Neural Transmission in the Senescent Brain

  • William Bondareff
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 129)

Abstract

Neural transmission involves electrochemical interactions between two neurons along a region of interneuronal contact known as a synapse. In vertebrate nervous systems these interactions are mediated by transmitter substances, which react with receptor sites on synaptic membranes affecting their permeability to various ions. Synaptic membranes are modified segments of neuronal plasma membranes, and their properties vary in different types of synapses.

Keywords

Dentate Gyrus Synaptic Membrane Synaptic Loss Neural Transmission Dendritic Shaft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Bondareff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and Institute of PsychiatryNorthwestern University Medical SchoolChicagoUSA

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