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Imagery pp 75-106 | Cite as

Treatment Outcome in Relation to Visual Imagery, Suggestibility, Transference, and Creativity

  • Joseph Reyher

Abstract

The rapidly proliferating development of treatment procedures utilizing visual imagery is an index of the excitement being generated by its return from ostracism. This excitement is a welcome quickening of the pulse in the growing malaise of psychotherapy research. To wit, it does not make any difference what you do, just do it convincingly (Frank, 1979), and be enthusiastic (Shapiro and Morris, 1978). Simpler yet, just put everyone on a waiting list (Bergin and Lambert, 1978). Unfortunately, visual imagery methods are sufficiently varied as to obscure what it is about them that warrants the excitement and interest. To aid my own thinking, I have ordered these by classifying them into four disparate categories: guided imagery, behavior modification, active imagination and spontaneous visual imagery, which I call emergent uncovering psychotherapy. In guided imagery, the client is given standard scenes as stimuli with the purpose of symbolically addressing ignored parts of the self, archetypes and recurrent problems in living. By artful manipulation of the client’s imagery, these sources of emotional difficulty can be ameliorated or resolved symbolically. It is an absorbing, creative interaction between both participants. In behavior modification (systematic desensitization, implosive and flooding methods, modeling, rehearsal, covert conditioning), visual imagery is used as a means to interfere with undesirable stimulus-response or antecedent-consequent relationships.

Keywords

Visual Imagery Abnormal Psychology Security Operation Systematic Desensitization Favorable Treatment Outcome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Reyher
    • 1
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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