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Imagery pp 55-64 | Cite as

Discoveries about the Mind’s Ability to Organize and Find Meaning in Imagery

  • Joseph E. Shorr

Abstract

We are dealing, after all, with the private process of theory construction or innovation, the phase not open to inspection by others and indeed perhaps little understood by the originator himself. (Albert Einstein)

Keywords

Phantom Limb Subjective Meaning Imaginary Situation Consensual Validation Unconscious Material 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph E. Shorr
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Psycho-Imagination TherapyLos AngelesUSA

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