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Imagery pp 267-280 | Cite as

Guided Fantasy as a Psychotherapeutic Intervention: An Experimental Study

  • Steven M. Blankman

Abstract

Guided-fantasy methods of psychotherapy, such as Desoille’s (1966) directed daydream, Leuner’s (1969, 1977, 1978) guided affective imagery, and Rochkind and Conn’s (1973) guided fantasy encounter, have been described in many anecdotal and theoretical presentations (Garufi, 1977; Hammer, 1967, Johnsgard, 1969; Kosbab, 1974; Krojanker, 1966; Schutz, 1967; Van den Berg, 1962). These therapeutic methods are based on the assumption that important psychological conflicts, feelings, attitudes, and response tendencies of the therapy client can be elicited and represented in the form of a sequential, drama-like imaginal experience. Typically, the client assumes a relaxed state, and then the therapist suggests a fantasy setting, situation or symbol which serves as the starting point for the client’s fantasy. The therapist facilitates the client’s experiencing and reporting of the ongoing fantasy and may suggest images or courses of action the client can take in the fantasy.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Psychotherapeutic Intervention Final Questionnaire Male Client Female Client 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven M. Blankman
    • 1
  1. 1.Shasta County Mental Health ServicesReddingUSA

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