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Gene Transfer in Eukaryotes

  • F. H. Ruddle
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 31)

Abstract

Somatic cell genetics relies on parasexual events in in vitro cell populations. The analysis of parasexuality can be used to make inferences on the genetic organization of the test material. The approach is general and can be applied currently to any mammalian species, and to any eukaryote with the future development of appropriate cell culture methods. Parasexuality can be defined more specifically in terms of gene transfer and gene loss mechanisms. Gene transfer mechanisms will be emphasized, because they can be more rigorously defined and controlled in experimental terms.

Keywords

Gene Transfer Thymidine Kinase Recipient Cell Globin Gene Thymidine Kinase Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. H. Ruddle
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology and Human Genetics Kline Biology TowerYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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