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Thought Disorder and Language Use in Schizophrenia

  • Sherry Rochester
Part of the Applied Psycholinguistics and Communication Disorders book series (APCD)

Abstract

Schizophrenic speakers sometimes fail to speak coherently. Operationally, this means that listeners sometimes cannot follow schizophrenic speakers even though the speakers are using familiar words in well-formed sentences. It also means that the listeners are agreed on this matter, saying, in effect, “These speakers cannot be understood through any reasonable effort.” It is not always true that schizophrenic speakers fail to produce coherent discourse. However, when they do fail, their failures are regarded as significant, as, in Norman Cameron’s words, “one of the most outstanding characteristics of schizophrenic thinking” (1938b, p. 2).

Keywords

Schizophrenic Patient Verbal Behavior Naturalistic Study Abnormal Psychology Thought Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sherry Rochester
    • 1
  1. 1.Clarke Institute of PsychiatryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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