Advertisement

Review of Semiconductor Physics

  • Richard Dalven

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is a brief discussion of some topics in semiconductor physics that will be useful in our discussion of applications. Since it is assumed that the reader has had an introductory course in solid state physics at the level of the book by Kittel,(1) some of the chapter will be review material. However, since some of the topics may be new to some readers, references to more complete and/or advanced treatments are given.

Keywords

Conduction Band Valence Band Effective Mass Carrier Lifetime Valence Band Maximum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References and Comments

  1. 1.
    C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, Fifth Edition, John Wiley, New York (1976).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    C. Kittel, Reference 1, pages 201-203.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    See, for example, L. Pincherle, Electronic Energy Bands in Solids, Macdonald, London (1971), Section 6.3, page 172.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. Tinkham, Group Theory and Quantum Mechanics, McGraw-Hill, New York (1964), Section 8.3, page 277.MATHGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Adapted from D. Long, Energy Bands in Semiconductors, John Wiley, New York (1968), Figure 2.7(a), page 39.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Adapted from J. R. Chelikowsky and M. L. Cohen, Physical Review B, 10, 5095 (1974), Figure 2 (using the nonlocal pseudopotential calculation).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Adapted from D. Long, Reference 5, Figure 6.1, page 101.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    C. Kittel, Reference 1, pages 214-217.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, Fourth Edition, John Wiley, New York (1971), page 328.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    A. J. Dekker, Solid State Physics, Prentice-Hall, New York (1957), Section 10.4, gives a brief discussion of electron motion at higher energies in the bands.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    D. Long, Reference 5, page 105.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    C. Kittel, Reference 1, page 169.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    See, for example, A. J. Dekker, Reference 10, pages 329-331.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    See, for example, C. Kittel, Quantum Theory of Solids, John Wiley, New York (1963), page 187.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    C. Kittel, Reference 1, Chapter 8, Tables 1 and 3, pages 210 and 231, gives values of energy gaps and carrier mobilities for a number of semiconductors.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    M. L. Schultz, Infrared Physics, 4, 93–112 (1964), page 96.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    See, for example, R. A. Smith, Semiconductors, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1961), page 79.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    C. Kittel, Reference 1, pages 231-237.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    R. A. Smith, Reference 17, Section 4.3, pages 82-92.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    A. S. Grove, Physics and Technology of Semiconductor Devices, John Wiley, New York (1967), Section 4.4, pages 100–106, especially Figure 4.7, page 104.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    S. Wang, Solid State Electronics, McGraw-Hill, New York (1966), Section 3.5, pages 146–152.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    S. M. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, John Wiley, New York (1969), pages 32–38.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    A. J. Dekker, Reference 10, Section 12.4, pages 310-314.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    J. S. Blakemore, Semiconductor Statistics, Pergamon Press, New York (1962), Section 3.5, pages 166–169.MATHGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    N. W. Ashcroft and N. D. Mermin, Solid State Physics, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York (1976), page 584.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    H. M. Rosenberg, Low Temperature Solid State Physics, Oxford University Press, Oxford (1963), pages 237–240.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    See, for example, C. Kittel, Thermal Physics, John Wiley, New York (1968), Chapters 9 and 14.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    S. Wang, Reference 21, page 149, equation (3.57).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    See, for example, W. R. Beam, Electronics of Solids, McGraw-Hill, New York (1965), Section 4.6, pages 190–200.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    S. Wang, Reference 21, Section 5.5, pages 275-282.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    W. R. Beam, Reference 29, page 165.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    A. S. Grove, Reference 20, page 142.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    H. J. Hovel, Semiconductors and Semimetals, R. K. Willardson and A. C. Beer (editors), Academic Press, New York (1975), Volume 11, pages 11, 12, and 14.Google Scholar

Suggested Reading

  1. C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, Fifth Edition, John Wiley, New York (1976). The current edition of this modern classic is our basic background reference on solid state physics at the introductory level. Chapter 8 provides an introduction to semiconductor physics. We will sometimes refer to earlier editions of this book.Google Scholar
  2. A. J. Dekker, Solid State Physics, Prentice-Hall, New York (1957). This text is now somewhat out of date but is clearly written. It also contains some interesting material not readily found elsewhere at the introductory level. Chapters 12 and 13 discuss semiconductors.Google Scholar
  3. R. A. Smith, Semiconductors, Cambridge University Press (1959). This book provides detailed discussions of many topics (especially transport properties) in semiconductor physics. Many of the data provided on specific semiconductors are now out of date; beware of typographical errors in early printings. (A second edition of this book was published in 1978.).Google Scholar
  4. D. Long, Energy Bands in Semiconductors, John Wiley, New York (1968). This short book provides, among other things, a compendium of band structures and other data on semiconductors.Google Scholar
  5. B. G. Streetman, Solid State Electronic Devices, Prentice-Hall, New York (1972). Chapter 3 of this fine textbook provides an introduction to semiconductor physics, written with applications in mind.Google Scholar
  6. N. W. Ashcroft and N. D. Mermin, Solid State Physics, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York (1976). Chapter 28 of this advanced-level textbook discusses the physics of semiconductors.Google Scholar
  7. W. R. Beam, Electronics of Solids, McGraw-Hill, New York (1965). Chapter 4 of this electrical engineering text discusses semiconductor physics, again with an eye toward applications.Google Scholar
  8. J. C. Phillips, Bonds and Bands in Semiconductors, Academic Press, New York (1973). An interdisciplinary discussion of many topics in semiconductor physics, emphasizing relationships between structure and properties.Google Scholar
  9. C. A. Hogarth (editor), Materials Used in Semiconductor Devices, Interscience Publishers, New York (1965). While now somewhat old, this book summarizes some of the physics and properties of a number of useful semiconductors, including silicon, InSb, and the lead salt semiconductors PbS, PbSe, and PbTe.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Dalven
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

Personalised recommendations