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X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

  • J. A. Patton
Chapter

Abstract

X-ray fluorescence imaging is a relatively new technique for imaging distributions of nonradioactive elements within the body. The emission of characteristic X-rays (fluorescence) is induced by irradiation with an external source of photons as shown in Fig. 7–1. If the photons from the exciting source have an energy close to but greater than the K-shell binding energy of the atom being irradiated, there is a high probability that the photon will undergo photoelectric absorption by one of the K-shell electrons. The electron would then be ejected with a kinetic energy equal to the energy of the incoming photon minus the K-shell binding energy. The atom is left in an excited state with a vacancy in the K shell. This vacancy is promptly filled by an electron (most probably from the L shell) with the excess energy carried off by an Auger electron (which is absorbed within a short distance), or by a characteristic X-ray whose energy is equal to the difference between the binding of the K and L shells (28.5 ke V for iodine).For elements with relatively high atomic numbers this X-ray is of sufficient energy to escape the patient and be counted by an external detector (Tinney, 1971).

Keywords

Iodine Content Semiconductor Detector Normal Thyroid Tissue High Atomic Number Colloid Cyst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Patton
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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