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Rectilinear Scanners

  • Dennis D. Patton
Chapter

Abstract

The rectilinear scanner is a device for imaging the distribution of radioactive material within the body. It is a systematic point sampling device that forms its image by moving over (scanning) the field of interest. Basically, the rectilinear scanner is a rigid bar with a radiation detector at one end and a light and a stylus at the other end (Fig. 3–1). When the detector detects radiation, the light flashes, exposing some film, and the stylus taps, marking some paper. The rigid bar provides position data linking the radiation detector and the flashing light. The motion is boustrophedonic,* alternately left to right and right to left. Of course, this simple model of the rectilinear scanner becomes more and more complex as one introduces the ancillary devices necessary to make the scanner operate properly. These will be covered in the following sections.

Keywords

Count Rate Point Spread Function Modulation Transfer Function Gamma Energy Background Suppression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis D. Patton
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Nuclear Medicine, Health Sciences CenterUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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