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Anatomical Aspects of the Transseptal Approach to the Sphenoid Sinus

  • Bruce W. Pearson
  • Eugene B. Kern
  • Thomas J. McDonald
  • Edward R. LawsJr.

Abstract

Approximately one quarter of the brain’s surface is supported by the frontal, ethmoid, and sphenoid bones. Each of these bones is pneumatized by sinus cavities that in turn derive from the nasal cavity. Not surprisingly, the subject of rhinological anatomy continues to engage the attention of surgeons called on to approach the base of the skull. Transseptal transphenoidal hypophysectomy provides a notable example of the validity of this interest. The first half of the transseptal operation proceeds through normal nasal anatomy.

Keywords

Sphenoid Sinus Septal Cartilage Lateral Cartilage Nasal Resistance Nasal Dorsum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    E.B. Kern, B.W. Pearson, T.J. McDonald, and E.R. Laws, Jr., The trans-septal approach to lesions of the pituitary and parasellar regions, Laryngoscope 89, Suppl. 15, May 1979.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    M. Hasegawa, E.B. Kern, and P.C. O’Brien, Dynamic changes of nasal resistance, Ann. Otol. Rhinol Laryngol. 88:66–71, 1979.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    M.H. Cottle, R.M. Loring, G.G. Fischer, and I.E. Gaynon, The “maxilla premaxilla” approach to extensive nasal septum surgery, Arch. Otolaryngol. 68:301, 1958.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce W. Pearson
    • 1
  • Eugene B. Kern
    • 1
  • Thomas J. McDonald
    • 1
  • Edward R. LawsJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OtolaryngologyMayo Medical SchoolRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of Neurological SurgeryMayo Medical SchoolRochesterUSA

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