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Principles of Continuous Flow Cell Separation in a Circumferential Flow Disposable Channel

  • Jeane P. Hester
  • Robert M. Kellogg
  • Alfred Mulzet
  • Kenneth B. McCredie
  • Emil J. Freireich
Part of the Biological Separations book series (BIOSEP)

Abstract

Continuous flow centrifugation (CFC) is used to centrifuge large volumes of blood and concentrate cellular or acellular subfractions for extraction. The efficient separation of most blood components requires a system that permits removal of selected elements while returning most of the remaining fractions to the donor/patient. When used in the biological sciences, these systems must be closed and sterile. In 1965, Freireich et al. reported the first use of a closed, sterile, continuous flow centrifuge in man to perform leukocyte extraction. Application growth is based on the fact that these systems allow access to a donor/patient’s entire blood volume for processing and manipulation. A nonexhaustive list of CFC applications is contained in Table 1.

Keywords

Axial Flow Buffy Coat Centrifuge Speed Separation Channel Collection Chamber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeane P. Hester
    • 1
  • Robert M. Kellogg
    • 2
  • Alfred Mulzet
    • 2
  • Kenneth B. McCredie
    • 1
  • Emil J. Freireich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Developmental Therapeutics, M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor InstituteThe University of Texas System Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Biomedical Systems DivisionIBM CorporationEndicottUSA

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