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Uniqueness pp 145-162 | Cite as

Attitudes and Beliefs as Uniqueness Attributes

  • C. R. Snyder
  • Howard L. Fromkin
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

All individuals develop a set of attitudes and beliefs about their world and about themselves. These beliefs are a result of the prior and current experiences of each person. Our beliefs can serve as another important source whereby we may derive a sense of difference relative to other people. The present chapter investigates the role of attitudes and beliefs in generating a sense of difference.

Keywords

Research Participant Aesthetic Preference Attitude Position Personality Interpretation Attractive Female 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. R. Snyder
    • 1
  • Howard L. Fromkin
    • 2
  1. 1.The University of KansasLawrenceUSA
  2. 2.York UniversityDownsviewCanada

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