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Uniqueness pp 13-29 | Cite as

Do Birds of a Feather Always Flock Together?

  • C. R. Snyder
  • Howard L. Fromkin
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

The introductory chapter provides a glimpse of the uniqueness-seeking phenomenon as revealed through literature. Based on such anecdotal evidence, it would seem that person-to-person encounters that result in self-perceptions of very high degrees of interpersonal similarity are likely to be a threat to a person’s sense of uniqueness. Therefore, one would expect such threats of very high similarity to be noxious and aversive. Yet, at first glance, the vast majority of research does not support this contention. A careful analysis of this body of research, however, reveals a more complicated picture in which the negative and positive outcomes of interpersonal similarity vary systematically accordingly to the conditions that pose a threat to a sense of uniqueness. The following sections examine the prevailing theories and research on interpersonal similarity. Furthermore, limitations to such research are described, and the possibility of uniqueness seeking is introduced in the context of a new research paradigm.

Keywords

Social Psychology Research Participant Social Comparison Comparison Attribute Experimental Social Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. R. Snyder
    • 1
  • Howard L. Fromkin
    • 2
  1. 1.The University of KansasLawrenceUSA
  2. 2.York UniversityDownsviewCanada

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