Why All the Chafing over Chomsky?

  • O. Hobart Mowrer
Part of the Cognition and Language book series (CALS)

Abstract

The course in introductory psychology which I took as a freshman at the University of Missouri, in 1925, was taught by Max F. Meyer, who, in 1911, had written the first psychology textbook with the word “behavior” in the title. Meyer had been originally trained (in Germany) as a physicist, with only a tangential interest in psychology; and when he emigrated to the United States and entered the latter field, it was with an intransigent objectivism which pervaded his writings and which he would not allow his students to violate, even in the slightest degree, in the classroom. As a behaviorist, Meyer thus antedated John B. Watson, whom I also read avidly; and A. P. Weiss had been one of Meyer’s early students. So if I lay claim to having once been a “primitive behaviorist” myself, I submit that my credentials are of the highest order.

Keywords

Assimilation Hull Hunt Stim Stake 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Hobart Mowrer
    • 1
  1. 1.University of IllinoisChampaign-UrbanaUSA

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