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The Concept of the Behavioral Mechanism in Language

  • Kurt Salzinger
Part of the Cognition and Language book series (CALS)

Abstract

Tracing the contributions of scientists to their intellectual siblings and descendants is at best a risky business. It should be done a long time after both the contributors and recipients have done their major work, so that one can do the analysis with the required cool calculating gaze that yields objective conclusions. We cannot indulge in that luxury in psychology, however. Psychologists, it is said, unlike scientists in the physical sciences who stand on the shoulders of their ancestors, step in their faces; changes in theories of psychology take place so fast that constant evaluation of influences is not only not possible, but is not even particularly useful in taking full advantage of whatever contributions are made.

Keywords

Conditional Stimulus Unconditional Stimulus Verbal Behavior Discriminative Stimulus Operant Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kurt Salzinger

There are no affiliations available

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