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Neuropsychological Deficits in Alcoholics: Lack of Personality (MMPI) Correlates

  • Tor Løberg
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 126)

Abstract

The question of personality disorders in alcoholics, alcohol abusers or problem drinkers has long been one of serious concern—whether the possible disturbances are thought of as primary to the alcoholic career, concomitant to drinking-related problems, due to possible brain dysfunction—or all of these. Extensive research work has been done with so-called objective or psychometric personality tests like the MMPI. Hoffman (1976) and Neuringer & Clopton (1976) are referred to for recent surveys of studies in this area. A relatively typical personality profile has generally been found, characterized by high elevations in personality test scales like depression and psychopathic deviate, less frequent with elevations in the psychasthenia and schizophrenia scales as well. The necessity of examining types of alcoholics has, however, been strongly advocated (Hoffman, 1976; Neuringer & Clopton, 1976).

Keywords

Personality Disorder Alcohol Related Problem Neuropsychological Deficit Neuropsychological Test Battery Personality Disturbance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tor Løberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeuropsychologyUniversity of BergenNorway

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