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Visual Cortical Evoked Potentials in Alcoholics and Normals Maintained on Lithium Carbonate: Augmentation and Reduction Phenomena

  • R. B. Hubbard
  • L. L. Judd
  • L. Y. Huey
  • D. F. Kripke
  • D. S. Janowsky
  • A. S. Lewis
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 126)

Abstract

Visual cortical evoked potentials (EPs) have been employed in examining many Psychopathologic and neurologic states in man: assessing intellectual levels of functioning, assessing hemispheric specialization of function, and assessing drug effect, not to mention the enormous quantity of work accomplished in the basic sciences with single-cell and ganglion preparations. A clinical area of interest is application of EPs in Psychopathologic states.

Keywords

Affective Disorder Hemispheric Specialization Research Diagnostic Criterion Affective Illness Organic Brain Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Hubbard
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. L. Judd
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Y. Huey
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. F. Kripke
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. S. Janowsky
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. S. Lewis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California San DiegoUSA
  2. 2.School of Medicine, Department of PsychiatryVeterans Administration HospitalSan DiegoUSA

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