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Protracted Brain Dysfunction after Alcohol Withdrawal in Monkeys

  • H. Begleiter
  • V. DeNoble
  • B. Porjesz
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 126)

Abstract

The alcohol withdrawal syndrome includes a broad spectrinn of severity. The milder stages of the syndrome include such symptoms as slight tremor, malaise and general irritability, and the more severe stages of the syndome are characterized by delirium tremors. While the nature of the underlying mechanisms is not established, the evidence presently available suggests that there may well be different mechanisms for different manifestations associated with withdrawal.

Keywords

Visual Evoke Potential Hourly Time Interval Alcohol Withdrawal Blood Alcohol Concentration Control Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Begleiter
    • 1
  • V. DeNoble
    • 1
  • B. Porjesz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryDownstate Medical Center State University of New YorkBrooklynUSA

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