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The Educational Approach to Social Skills Training in Marriage and Family Intervention

  • Harvey Joanning
  • Gregory W. Brock
  • Arthur W. Avery
  • Jeanette D. Coufal
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 11)

Abstract

The delivery of mental health services has long been based on a system modelled after methods used by physicians. Criticisms of this so called “medical model” have emerged repeatedly over several decades (McLeMore & Benjamin, 1979; Miller, 1969; Sanford, 1955). Recently a clear conceptual alternative to the medical model has been outlined in a series of related articles by Guerney and associates (Guerney, Stollak & Guerney, 1970; Guerney, Stollak & Guerney, 1971; Guerney, Guerney & Stollak, 1973). The central theme of these papers has been to suggest that an “educational” alternative to the medical model is needed. The educational model can be defined as a systematic attempt to teach personal and interpersonal attitudes and skills which individuals can apply to solve present and future psychological problems and to enhance their satisfaction with life (Guerney et al., 1971). Shifts in conceptual orientation needed to adopt the educational model as well as methods used to apply the model are outlined below.

Keywords

Skill Training Relationship Satisfaction Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation Family Intervention Social Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harvey Joanning
    • 1
  • Gregory W. Brock
    • 1
  • Arthur W. Avery
    • 2
  • Jeanette D. Coufal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child Development and Family StudiesTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA
  2. 2.Division of Child Development and Family RelationsUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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