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Methodology for the Isolation of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons for Qualitative, Quantitative, and Bioassay Studies

  • R. F. Severson
  • M. E. Snook
  • R. F. Arrendale
  • O. T. Chortyk
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 16)

Abstract

Sources of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the environment generally also contain heteroatom analogues of PAH. These 0- and N-PAH also contribute to air pollution (Dong et al, 1977; Lao et al, 1975) and are found along with S-PAH, such as dibenzo-thiophene, in petroleum (McKay et al, 1976) and coal-derived fuels (Sharley, 1976). They often interfere in the analyses of PAH because of similar chromatographic characteristics. Therefore, in choosing a method for the analysis of PAH in an environmental sample, it is important to consider the source of the PAH and the possible presence of heteroatom aromatics.

Keywords

Silicic Acid Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cigarette Smoke Condensate Chromatographic Isolation Monomethyl Derivative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. F. Severson
    • 1
  • M. E. Snook
    • 1
  • R. F. Arrendale
    • 1
  • O. T. Chortyk
    • 1
  1. 1.Tobacco Laboratory, Science and Education Administration-Federal ResearchUnited States Department of AgricultureAthensUSA

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