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The Correlation of the Toxicity to Algae of Hydrocarbons and Halogenated Hydrocarbons with their Physical-Chemical Properties

  • T. C. Hutchinson
  • J. A. Hellebust
  • D. Tam
  • D. Mackay
  • R. A. Mascarenhas
  • W. Y. Shiu
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 16)

Abstract

There are strong incentives to develop methods of predicting the toxicity of environmental contaminants to specific biota. Consideration of the large number of contaminants, the wide variety of biota (many of which may change in susceptibility at different life stages, temperatures and other conditions), the range of possible concentration and exposure times, and the possibility of simultaneous stress from several contaminants suggests that it will be impossible to undertake experimental study of all the combinations of contaminant, biota and conditions which apply in the environment. Economies of effort can be achieved if methods can be developed to calculate the toxic effect from data such as the physical-chemical properties of the contaminant. A suitable approach would be to determine toxicity for some members of a chemically similar series of compounds (such as aromatic hydrocarbons) to a specific organism, correlate the toxicity with physical-chemical properties then infer the toxicity of other untested compounds from a knowledge of their physical-chemical properties.

Keywords

Partition Coefficient Halogenated Hydrocarbon Propyl Benzene Isopropyl Benzene Mole Fraction Ratio 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. C. Hutchinson
    • 1
  • J. A. Hellebust
    • 1
  • D. Tam
    • 1
  • D. Mackay
    • 1
  • R. A. Mascarenhas
    • 1
  • W. Y. Shiu
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Environmental StudiesUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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