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Halogenated Biphenyl Metabolism

  • S. Safe
  • C. Wyndham
  • A. Parkinson
  • R. Purdy
  • A. Crawford
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 16)

Abstract

The metabolism of xenobiotics occurs predominantly in the liver and is generally effected in two related phases. Phase I biotransformation includes oxidation, reduction and hydrolysis which either introduces or exposes a more polar substituent or group such as -OH, -SH, -NH2 and -COOH, Phase II biotransformation includes addition reactions which conjugate the electronegative group introduced or exposed during phase I metabolism with endogenous acids. A feature characteristic of these diverse biotransformations is that the metabolic products are generally more hydrophilic than the parent compound and this expedites their renal and biliary excretion.

Keywords

Microsomal Enzyme Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase Electronegative Group Polar Substituent Ambystoma Tigrinum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Safe
    • 1
  • C. Wyndham
    • 1
  • A. Parkinson
    • 1
  • R. Purdy
    • 1
  • A. Crawford
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Biochemistry Unit, Guelph Waterloo Center for Graduate Work in Chemistry, Guelph CampusUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada

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