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Trihalomethane Levels at Selected Water Utilities in Kentucky, U.S.A.

  • G. D. Allgeier
  • R. L. MullinsJr.
  • D. A. Wilding
  • J. S. Zogorski
  • S. A. Hubbs
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 16)

Abstract

For almost half a century, Americans have relied confidently upon their domestic water supply, assuming that drinking water was free of harmful contaminants. In November 1974, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced officially that trace quantities of 66 organic chemicals were identified in the New Orleans drinking water supply. Several of the compounds identified were suspected carcinogens. Partially in response to the events surrounding New Orleans, Congress passed legislation, Section 1442a-9 of the Safe Drinking Water Act, that directed EPA to conduct a comprehensive study of public water supplies and drinking water sources to determine the nature, extent, sources and means of control of contamination by chemicals or other substances suspected of being carcinogenic. In complying with this mandate by Congress, EPA initiated an extensive program to answer the questions raised by Congress concerning suspected carcinogens in drinking water.

Keywords

Drinking Water Water Treatment Plant Water Utility Finished Water American Water Work Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. D. Allgeier
    • 1
  • R. L. MullinsJr.
    • 1
  • D. A. Wilding
    • 1
  • J. S. Zogorski
    • 2
  • S. A. Hubbs
    • 3
  1. 1.University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  3. 3.Louisville Water CompanyLouisvilleUSA

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