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Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Marine Environment: Gulf of Maine Sediments and Nova Scotia Soils

  • R. A. Hites
  • R. E. Laflamme
  • J. G. WindsorJr.
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 16)

Abstract

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) occur widely in the lithosphere. They have been reported in various soils (Youngblood and Blumer, 1975; Laflamme and Hites, 1978), in marine sediments (Youngblood and Blumer, 1975; Hites et al, 1977), and in urban limnic sediments in the United States (Hites and Biemann, 1975; Wakeham, 1977) and in Europe (Grimmer and Böhnke, 1975; Muller et al, 1977; Giger and Schaffner, 1978). The concentrations of PAH range from less than 100 ppb for abyssal plain sediments to more than 100,000 ppb for sediments from highly urbanized areas. Much of the past work on the organic geochemistry of PAH has centered on understanding their sources, and there now seems to be a consesus (Youngblood and Blumer, 1975; Laflamme and Hites, 1978; Hites et al, 1977) that most (but not all) PAH in the sedimentary environment are due to combustion processes. However, little information is available on the mode(s) by which PAH are transported from the combustion source to the sediment. Existing data indicate high PAH levels at those locations which are close to centers of intense human activity and very low PAH levels at sites remote from anthropogenic influence. This is, however, only a qualitative observation which needs to be supplemented by a quantitative study. This paper represents such a study.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Nova Scotia Deep Ocean Combustion Source Total Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Hites
    • 1
  • R. E. Laflamme
    • 1
  • J. G. WindsorJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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