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Evaluation of Analytical Techniques for Assessment of Treatment Processes for Trace Halogenated Hydrocarbons

  • Massoud Pirbazari
  • Mark Herbert
  • Walter J. WeberJr.
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 16)

Abstract

Removal of trace amounts of halogenated hydrocarbons — materials suspect for potential toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic characteristics — from public drinking waters is one of the most challenging problems facing the water supply industry today. Conventional treatment technologies are being re-evaluated in this regard, and new and/or modified processes, such as adsorption on activated carbon, are being examined for their effectiveness in accomplishing such treatment.

Keywords

Activate Carbon Chlorinate Hydrocarbon Electrolytic Conductivity Static Headspace Dynamic Headspace 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massoud Pirbazari
    • 1
  • Mark Herbert
    • 1
  • Walter J. WeberJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Water Resources ProgramUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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