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Hospital Treatment of Pregnant Addicts

  • Virginia S. Ryan

Abstract

The treatment of addiction during pregnancy has become an overwhelming problem in many hospitals; some report drug abuse among as many as 15% of their delivering patients. Recent research suggests that pregnant addicts have many problems. These may include:
  1. 1.

    Physiological consequences of drug use and life style, for example, anemia, malnutrition, venereal disease, hepatitis, and numerous types of infections (Pelosi et al., 1975; Perlmutter, 1974);

     
  2. 2.

    Obstetrical complications, for example, spontaneous abortion, placenta previa, abruptio placenta, and post-partum hemorrhage (Pillari, 1975);

     
  3. 3.

    A reticence to request medical treatment until late in labor if at all (Pelosi et al., 1975); and

     
  4. 4.

    A need for psycho-social support to prepare the addicted woman for the coming child and to help her deal with the possible problems of caring for a baby suffering from subacute withdrawal following in utero associations with drugs (Brazelton, 1970; Wilson, 1977; Wilson, 1975).

     

Keywords

Obstetrical Complication Hospital Treatment Placenta Previa Pediatric Department Heroin Addict 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Virginia S. Ryan

There are no affiliations available

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