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Pretreatment Criminal Justice Status, Retention, and Posttreatment Outcomes

  • Robert J. Harford

Abstract

The majority of applicants for drug abuse treatment have been involved in criminal activities during the time period immediately preceding admission. Coercion by the criminal justice system (CJS), either explicit or anticipated, is the principal reason for seeking treatment. Perhaps 20% are forced by legal authorities to choose between treatment and incarceration (Burt, 1977), and an additional 40–50%, while not conditionally stipulated to treatment programs, are on probation, parole or have pending litigation when they apply. Since legal pressure increases the probability that applicants will accept treatment (Kleinhans and Harford, 1976), the percentage of nonvolunteers (persons who have an active CJS status) in intact treatment populations may range as high as 80%.

Keywords

Criminal Justice System Criminal Activity Drug Abuse Treatment Criminal Behavior Drug Abuser 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Harford
    • 1
  1. 1.Yale University School of MedicineUSA

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