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Naltrexone: In Opiate Treatment Programs and Detoxification Procedures

  • Leonard S. Brahen
  • Thomas Capone
  • Harold E. Adams
  • Raymond J. Condren

Abstract

Methadone is currently the primary drug treatment for narcotic addiction. It is widely used as a substitute for other opiates in maintenance programs, and is also used for opiate detoxification. Methadone is addictive and it has been criticized for perpetrating an addictive cycle (Coghlan et al., 1974; Brown et al., 1975). Fur-ther many deaths have been attributed to methadone. Methadone diversion, into the illicit channels has resulted in the promotion of criminality.

Keywords

Antagonist Treatment Opiate Dependence Narcotic Antagonist Narcotic Addiction Nassau County 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard S. Brahen
    • 1
  • Thomas Capone
    • 1
  • Harold E. Adams
    • 1
  • Raymond J. Condren
    • 1
  1. 1.County of Nassau, Department of Drug and Alcohol AddictionUSA

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