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A New Sociocultural-Clinical Approach to the Use of Narcotic Antagonists in Rehabilitation of Opiate Dependent Persons

  • Arnold Schecter

Abstract

In the 1960’s two chemotherapeutic approaches to opiate addict rehabilitation were introduced. Opiate maintenance clinics were once again tried--this time using the orally effective long acting synthetic opiate, methadone (Dole and Nyswander, 1965). At almost the same time Martin and colleagues at the Addiction Research Center, Lexington, Kentucky suggested the use of the synthetic opiate antagonist cyclazocine, an opiate blocking agent, as a useful chemotherapeutic adjunct in rehabilitation. It too was orally effective, potent and long acting. As a slightly agonistic antagonist, it caused dysphoric reactions during induction in some patients (Martin et al., 1965 and 1966; Martin, 1968). Methadone maintenance became enormously popular at this time and the antagonists were relegated to the role of a limited use research instrument.

Keywords

Drug Dependence Methadone Maintenance Treatment Methadone Maintenance Methadone Maintenance Therapy Heroin Addiction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnold Schecter
    • 1
  1. 1.New Jersey Medical SchoolUSA

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