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Strategy for Collection of Drinking Water Concentrates

  • Carl C. Smith
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 15)

Abstract

In the first chapter of a recent book on water analysis, Aaron Rosen reviewed the state of water analysis in 1950 and pointed out the need for a new and entirely different approach to sampling (1). Thus in 1950, Braus, Middleton, and Walton (2), using a column of activated carbon to filter 5000 gallons or more of water, were able to recover from 2 to 4 g of organic pollutants by extracting the carbon with ethyl ether and an additional 2 to 10 g by a second elution with ethanol. The process was subsequently scaled up eighty-fold (3); the ether was replaced with chloroform and water-free extracts of 150–1700 g were obtained. As recently as 1974, this same procedure was used to prepare the starting material for a detailed analysis of the organic pollutants in New Orleans drinking water (4).

Keywords

Drinking Water Total Organic Carbon Organic Pollutant Reverse Osmosis Granular Activate Carbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl C. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Health, College of MedicineUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

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