Advertisement

State-Of-The-Art Analytical Techniques for Ambient Vapor Phase Organics and Volatile Organics in Aqueous Samples from Energy-Related Activities

  • Edo D. Pellizzari
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 15)

Abstract

The presence of organic components in the ambient air is a fact of life in a modern society, since volatile organic compounds are ubiquitous. Automobile exhaust, fossil fuel burning, and the chemical industry contribute many organic compounds to the air. It is not unreasonable to expect that products from reactions of these chemicals with NO2 and SO2, by photochemical (1–5) or other processes, will be also observed in the atmosphere (6). However, many organic constituents are suspected to enter the environment directly by industrial pollution (7). Carcinogenic and mutagenic compounds find frequent use as intermediates in organic synthesis, e.g., in the preparation and use of plastics, fabrics, dyes, resins, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, etc. Organic solvents, heavily used in industry, are also sources of high levels of organic vapors.

Keywords

Aqueous Sample Alkyl Benzene Flow Tube Organic Vapor Solvent Impinger 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Calvert JG, Pitts JN: Photochemistry. New York, John Wiley and Sons, Inc, 1966, pp 366–557Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Leighton PA, Perkins WA: Air Pollution Foundation. Los Angeles, Rept 14, 1956Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Leighton PA, Perkins WA: Air Pollution Foundation. Los Angeles, Rept 24, 1958Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Leighton PA: Photochemistry of Air Pollution. New York, Academic Press, 1961, pp 1–200Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gould RF: Photochemical smog and ozone reactions. In: Advances in Chemistry Series 113, Washington, DC, Amer Chem Soc, 1976, p 285Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Matz J: Z Ges Hyg Ihre Grenzebiete 18:903, 1972Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Fishbein L: Chromatography of Environmental Hazards. New York, Elsevier Pub Co, 1972, p 499Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Pellizzari ED: Development of method for carcinogenic vapor analysis in ambient atmospheres. Research Triangle Park, Environ Prot Agency, EPA-650/2–74–121, 1974, pp 148Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Pellizzari ED: Development of analytical techniques for measuring ambient atmospheric carcinogenic vapors. Research Triangle Park, Environ Prot Agency, EPA-600/2–75–075, 1975, pp 187Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Pellizzari ED: The measurement of carcinogenic vapors in ambient atmospheres. Research Triange Park, Environ Prot Agency, EPA-600/7–77–055, 1977, pp 288Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Pellizzari ED: Analysis of organic air pollutants by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. Research Triangle Park, Environ Prot Agency, EPA-600/2–77–100, 1977, pp 104Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Pellizzari ED: The measurement of carcinogenic vapors in ambient atmospheres. Research Triangle Park, Environ Prot Agency, Contract No 68–02–1228, in preparationGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Pellizzari ED, Bunch JE, Berkley RE, Bursey JT: Identification of n-nitrosodimethylamine in ambient air by capillary gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer. Biomed Mass Spec 3:196–200, 1976CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Pellizzari ED, Carpenter B, Bunch JE, Sawicki E: Collection and analysis of trace organic vapor pollutants in ambient atmospheres — a technique for evaluating the concentration of vapors by sorbent media. J Environ Sci Tech 9:552–555, 1975CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Pellizzari ED, Bunch J, Carpenter B, Sawicki E: Collection and analysis of trace organic vapor pollutants in ambient atmospheres — studies on thermal desorption of organic vapor from sorbent media. J Environ Sci Tech 9:556–560, 1975CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Pellizzari ED, Bunch JE, Berkley RE, McRae J: Collection and analysis of trace organic vapor pollutants in ambient atmospheres — the performance of a Tenax GC cartridge sampler for hazardous vapors. Anal Letters 9:45–63, 1976CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Pellizzari ED, Bunch JE, Berkley RE, McRae J: Determination of trace hazardous organic vapor pollutants in ambient atmospheres by gas chromatography/mass spectrom-etry/computer. Anal Chem 48:803–807, 1976CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Pellizzari ED, Bunch JE, Bursey JT, Berkley RE, Sawicki E, Krost K: Estimation of n-nitrosodimethylamine levels in ambient air by capillary gas-liquid chromatography/ mass spectrometry. Anal Letters 9:579–594, 1976CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Pellizzari ED: Identification of components of energy-related wastes and effluents. Athens, Environ Prot Agency, Contract No 68–03–2368, in preparationGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Pellizzari ED, Castillo NP, Willis S, Smith D, Bursey JT: Identification of organic constituents in aqueous effluents from energy-related processes. Fuel Chemistry 23:144–155, 1978Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edo D. Pellizzari
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemistry and Life Sciences GroupResearch Triangle InstituteResearch Triangle ParkUSA

Personalised recommendations