Advertisement

Higher Plant Systems as Monitors of Environmental Mutagens

  • Frederick J. de Serres
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 15)

Abstract

When we monitor the environment for the mutagenicity of chemical pollutants, we have a diversity of purposes: we are concerned not only for the biological evaluation of chemicals that have already been introduced into the environment, but also for the new chemicals that are being introduced each year. We are not only interested in evaluating effects of exposure to these chemicals on man himself, but also in evaluating the effects on all other organisms.

Keywords

Plant System Chromosome Aberration Genetic Damage Corn Plant Chemical Mutagen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    de Serres FJ, Shelby MD, eds.: Higher plants as monitors for environmental mutagens. Environmental Health Perspectives, in press, 1978Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Drake JW, Abrahamson S, Crow JF, Hollaender A, Lederbert S, Legator MS, Neel JV, Shaw MW, Sutton HE, von Borstel RC, Zimmering S, de Serres FJ, Flamm WG: Environmental mutagenic hazards, Science 187:503–514, 1975CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ehrenberg L: Higher plants. In: Chemical Mutagens: Principles and Methods for Their Detection (Hollaender A, ed.) Vol 2, Plenum Press, New York, 1971, pp 356–365Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Fiskesjö G: Some results from Allium tests with organic halogenides. Hereditas 62:314, 1969CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Fiskesjö G: The effect of two organic mercury compounds on human leukocytes in vitro. Hereditas 64:142, 1970CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Flamm WG, Valcovic LR, Pertel P, Roderick TH, Ray V, de Serres FJ, D’Aquanno W, Fishbein L, Green S, Mailing HV, Mayer V, Privai M, Wolff G, Zeiger E: Approaches to determining the mutagenic properties of chemicals: Risk to future generations. J Environ Path Tox 1:301–352Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Gentile JM, Plewa MJ: A bioassay for screening host-mediated proximal mutagens in agriculture. Mutat Res 31:317, 1975Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Grant WF: Chromosome aberrations in plants as a monitoring system. Environmental Health Perspectives, in press, 1978Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kihlman BA: Root tips for studying the effects of chemicals on chromosomes. In: Chemical Mutagens: Principles and Methods for Their Detection (Hollaender A, ed.) Vol 2, Plenum Press, New York, 1971, pp 489–514Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Klekowski EJ, Jr.: Mutational load in a fern population growing in a polluted environment. Amer J Bot 63:1024–1030, 1976CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Klekowski EJ, Jr: Detection of mutational damage in fern populations: An in situ bioassay for mutagens in aquatic ecosystems. In: Chemical Mutagens: Principles and Methods for Their Detection (Hollaender A, de Serres FJ, eds.) Vol 5, Plenum Press, New York, 1978, pp 77–99Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Klekowski EJ, Jr, Berger BB: Chromosome mutations in a fern population growing in a polluted environment: A bioassay for mutagens in aquatic environments. Amer J Bot 63:239–246, 1976CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Klekowski EJ, Jr, Davis EL: Genetic damage to a fern population growing in a polluted environment: Segregation and description of gametophyte mutants. Canad J Bot 55:542–548, 1977CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Nilan RA, Vig BK: Plant test systems for detection of chemical mutagens. In: Chemical Mutagens: Principles and Methods for Their Detection (Hollaender A, ed.) Vol. 4, Plenum Press, New York, 1973, pp 143–170Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Paget GE, Walpole AL: Some cytological effects of griseofulvin. Nature (London) 182:1320, 1958ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Plewa MJ: Activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants: A preliminary discussion. Environmental Health Perspectives, in press, 1978Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Plewa MJ, Gentile JM: Plant activation of herbicides into mutagens — the mutagenicity of field applied atrazine on maize germ cells. Mutat Res 38:390, 1976Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Schairer LA, Van’t Hof J, Hayes CT, Burton RM, de Serres FJ: Exploratory monitoring of air pollutants for mutagenic activity with the Tradescantia stamen hair system. Environmental Health Perspectives, in press, 1978Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Sulouska K, Lindegren D, Eriksson G, Ehrenberg L: The mutagenic effects of low concentrations of ethylene oxide in air. Hereditas 62:264, 1969CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Wuu KD, Grant WF: Chromosomal aberrations induced by pesticides in meiotic cells of barley. Cytologia 32:31–41, 1967CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick J. de Serres
    • 1
  1. 1.Health SciencesNational Institute of EnvironmentalResearch Triangle ParkUSA

Personalised recommendations