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Chemical and Microbiological Studies of Mutagenic Pollutants in Real and Simulated Atmospheres

  • James N. PittsJr.
  • Karel A. Van Cauwenberghe
  • Daniel Grosjean
  • Joachim P. Schmid
  • Dennis R. Fitz
  • William L. BelserJr.
  • Gregory B. Knudson
  • Paul M. Hynds
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 15)

Abstract

In the early 1940’s the organic extracts of ambient particulate matter (POM) collected from urban air in the United States were found to be carcinogenic when administered subcutaneously to mice (1,2). Subsequently, this effect was also observed in experimental animals injected with extracts of ambient POM collected from Los Angeles photochemical smog (3) and in seven other U.S. cities (4). Similar results now have been found with ambient samples collected in various urban centers throughout the world. This carcinogenicity is customarily attributed to certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), e.g. benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), benz(a)anthracene and aza-arenes such as benzocarbazoles in the neutral fraction of the organic particulates and benzacridines and dibenzacridines in the basic fraction.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydro Mutagenic Activity Ames Test Photochemical Smog Ambient Particulate Matter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • James N. PittsJr.
    • 1
  • Karel A. Van Cauwenberghe
    • 1
  • Daniel Grosjean
    • 1
  • Joachim P. Schmid
    • 1
  • Dennis R. Fitz
    • 1
  • William L. BelserJr.
    • 2
  • Gregory B. Knudson
    • 2
  • Paul M. Hynds
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and Statewide, Air Pollution Research CenterUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biology and Statewide, Air Pollution Research CenterUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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