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Development and Plasticity of Neuronal Connections in the Lamb Visual System

  • P. G. H. Clarke
  • K. A. C. Martin
  • V. S. Ramachandran
  • V. M. Rao
  • D. Whitteridge
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 27)

Abstract

The visual system of the sheep has a number of features in common with that of the cat, but the wide interocular distance of the sheep makes it more suitable for the study of binocular receptive field disparities of cortical cells. On the day of birth the physiology of the lamb cortex is similar to that of the adult, with the exception of the limited amount of facilitation seen in cells with binocular fields. Monocular deprivation in the first three or four months of life results in most cortical cells being driven by the experienced eye alone and a relative shrinkage of cells in the lateral geniculate nucleus and medial interlaminar nucleus supplied by the deprived eye. Exposure of the deprived eye to stimulation of only one hour by slowly rotating square wave gratings increases the number of cortical cells which can be driven by the deprived eye.

Keywords

Cortical Cell Lateral Geniculate Nucleus Binocular Disparity Ocular Dominance Monocular Deprivation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. H. Clarke
    • 1
  • K. A. C. Martin
    • 1
  • V. S. Ramachandran
    • 1
  • V. M. Rao
    • 1
  • D. Whitteridge
    • 1
  1. 1.University Laboratory of PhysiologyOxfordEngland

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